Auckland - West

Mainly West of Queen Street - seen through my lens

Month: June 2010 (page 2 of 3)

Te Komoki and Rainbow

Te Komoki and Rainbow

Te Komoki and Rainbow

The conical hill at right is Te Komoki (Jackie Peak, map), which featured in this blog before. We are standing on Huia Point Lookout, the sun has just risen, and there is a light mist in the air, slowly drifting over towards us.

Advertisement: an exhibition of paintings by Don Binney, Seaward Paths to Erangi, will be held at The Diversion Gallery, Grove Mill Winery, Cnr State Highway 63 and Waihopai Valley Road, Renwick, Marlborough. Opening at 6 p.m. on Monday, 21 June to 7 August. Don Binney, who turned 70 earlier in the year, has a deep connection to the Waitakere Ranges, going right back to his youth.

The major painting in the exhibition depicts Te Komoki with a large spur-winged plover (a ‘masked lapwing’ for Australians), entitled Huia Bay Spurwing II. (If you are curious, here is a page which shows Huia Bay Spurwing I   among other pictures by Don Binney.)

The Coot

The Coot

The Coot

Seen at Western Springs.

A Weekend Reflection, hosted by James at Newtown Area Photo.

The Lineup

The Lineup

The Lineup

A sequel to the recent oystercatcher photo, showing how I got all my ducks in a row, I mean oystercatchers, of course. Wood Bay, Titirangi.

Self Portrait at the Museum

Self Portrait at the Museum

Self Portrait at the Museum

Auckland War Memorial Museum are having an exhibition “Kai to Pie” from June 12 to 25 October (kai is a Maori word meaning food). From the program notes:

“Kai to Pie — Pie to Chai — Nosh to Posh. Whatever way you slice it, Auckland’s stories can be told through food: from the extraordinary wealth of people and cultures, to its fertile abundance of land, sun and sea, come up to the Museum for a serving of Auckland on your plate.”

The image is a reflection in one of the exhibits, obviously dealing with seafood.

Painted Boxes: Heron Park (Doug Ford)

Painted Boxes: Heron Park (Doug Ford)

Painted Boxes: Heron Park (Doug Ford)

(Wednesday is for painted boxes.)

This is a box by Doug Ford, situated where Blockhouse Bay Road meets Great North Road (map). Painted in 2005, it depicts 3 species of herons (white-faced heron, white heron, reef heron – front to back, or if you speak Latin they are Ardea novaehollandiae, Egretta alba modesta, Egretta sacra). On the other side we have a landscape with a white heron in flight, see picture below, where one can see a bit of the Avondale Lions Club in the background.

The white heron is pretty rare in this part of New Zealand, but is occasionally seen around the shores of the Manukau Harbour, and it has also been quite some time since I last saw a reef heron. But white-faced herons are abundant wherever there are shores or wetlands.

Edit 19 Jan 2011: This box has been replaced (on December 5, 2010) by a brand new one, free of any artistic merit…
(Thanks to Lisa of Timespanner, who researched the disappearance of the herons.)

Painted Boxes: Heron Park (Doug Ford)

Painted Boxes: Heron Park (Doug Ford)

Three Oystercatchers

Three Oystercatchers

Three Oystercatchers

These are South Island Pied Oystercatchers (Haematopus ostralegus), in Wood Bay (map). When the tide comes in, they are pushed from the mudflats of the Manukau Harbour to the shore — where a photographer might be expecting them. We had a lot of rain recently, but yesterday’s long fine intervals gave this opportunity.

Don’t even think about red-eye correction!

Pou Whenua: Karekare

Pou Whenua: Karekare

Pou Whenua: Karekare

This pou (carved pole) is close to the Karekare car park, in the direction of the surf club. It signifies the spiritual guardianship of Te Kawarau a Maki of the place. “It also recognises that Karekare is a special place to be enjoyed and respected by all.” (From the explanatory sign.)

This Is Not a Love Shop

This Is Not a Love Shop

This Is Not a Love Shop

Karangahape Road in Auckland is nothing if not colourful, and the name of this shop at No. 290 adds more colour, offering quality second hand clothing including vintage labels and designer fashion. It was their mannequins in the window, entangled in audio tape, that first caught my eye as I was passing by (see below); only as I walked back on the other side of the road did I notice the facade belonging to a bygone era.

There are many old buildings here, in various states of repair and/or refurbishment. This shop was built around 1925 for the shoe retailers R. Hannah & Co, who go back to the late 19th century and are still around and kicking (but not in this building).

 

Chaise Lange (Peter Lange)

Coffee Break

Coffee Break

This happy moment of caffeine indulgence presented itself to me when I took pictures of this brick art bench by Peter Lange outside Caluzzi Bar and Cabaret in Karangahape Road. As I was taking pictures, these two gentlemen emerged from the Thirsty Dog Tavern and Cafe next door, asking me if they should liven up the image by sitting on the bench – thank you guys, much obliged, you made my day, and my blog! (I don’t even know their names, they were so eager to get back to work.)

Peter Lange has appeared on this blog before – he has honed pottery and bricklaying to a fine art, with accomplished skill, great imagination, and a lovely sense of humour. He is a studio tenant at the Corban Estate Art Centre in Henderson.

This is from the “News” tab on Peter’s website: “With Jenny, my daughter, I recently installed a seat on Karangahape Rd “Chaise Lange” which is designed to hold 5 large drag queens dancing and also provide casual seating for passers-by. Made of a steel plate core and tiled with 1300 hand-made tiles.”

And here is the video of the opening ceremony.

Chaise Lange (Peter Lange)

Chaise Lange (Peter Lange)

Mo Tenei Wa (Tony Brown)

Tony Brown

Tony Brown

Last night was the opening of an exhibition of paintings by Tony Brown at the Upstairs Gallery of Lopdell House in Titirangi. The title of the show is “the time is now – MO TENEI WA”, and the images are testimony of the artist’s endeavour to acknowledge and affirm his Maori roots and ancestry.

That’s Tony above with one of his works (acrylic on board), entitled Matauranga (a Maori word that encompasses knowledge, wisdom and understanding). The exhibition is open daily from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. until Sunday, July 4.

Tony’s website is www.tonybrown-artist.blogspot.com. Tony Brown is a resident artist at Corban Estate Arts Centre, his studio space is in the historic winery buildings at the estate.

Pedro, Angela and Mark, shown below (from left), provided fine musical entertainment for the evening. Their group is called Chillele (“cello, ukulele, sweet guitar and lush vocals to enhance your celebratory experience” says their card, and I would happily agree — Phone numbers: 817 1019, 027 216 6824, 817 4163). They are from nearby Parau, and are available for hire at functions of any kind.

Chillele

Chillele

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