Auckland - West

Mainly West of Queen Street - seen through my lens

Month: June 2011 (page 1 of 3)

Walking the Dog

Pohutukawa Glade, Point Chevalier

Pohutukawa Glade, Point Chevalier

Point Chevalier’s Harbour View Reserve is a beautiful stand of mature pohutukawa trees, sloping down from the northern end of Harbour View Road to the beach. The open character of these trees gives a cathedral-like atmosphere.

Painted Boxes: Pacific Patterns

Pacific Patterns

Pacific Patterns

This transformer box stands in Daphne Street, Kelston, and is covered in patterns of the Pacific. Painter unknown (to me).

Midwinter Beach Party

South Piha

South Piha

When I walked the Mercer Bay Loop the other day, I also went down to Piha. These people came just at the right time to provide a colourful foreground on the otherwise deserted beach. Must have been the filming of a commercial or some such.

Straight ahead is Camel Rock (Taitomo Island).

Pou Whenua: Hinerangi

Pou Whenua: Hinerangi

Pou Whenua: Hinerangi

This pou depicts Hinerangi gazing out over the sea, mourning her husband who had been taken by the waves while fishing the treacherous waters of the Tasman Sea. The carving is by Sunnah Thompson of Te Kawerau a Maki, recently unveiled (April 21, 2011). The full text of the interpretive signage is reproduced at the end of the post. Below is an image of the magnificent context of Te Ahua Point at Mercer Bay; with a bit of imagination one can discern the statue as a tiny mark just left of centre.

Looking South from Mercer Bay Loop Track

Looking South from Mercer Bay Loop Track

Pou Whenua: Hinerangi

Pou Whenua: Hinerangi

Pou Whenua: Hinerangi

Pou Whenua: Hinerangi

From the interpretive plaque:

This carved pou symbolises the manawhenua, or spiritual guardianship of Te Kawerau a Maki, the local Tangata Whenua. It also recognises that this is a special place, one of the oldest settled parts of the Waitakere Ranges.

This Pou specifically relates to an early Tupuna, Hinerangi, a chiefly young Ngaoho woman named in honour of a renowned Turehu ancestress.

Because of her beauty, skill and descent, many young rangatira sought her as a partner. Eventually Hinerangi chose a young chieftain from Karekare and settled there in his village and lived happily until an aitua or tragic accident.

At the southern end of Te Unuhanga o Rangitoto or Mercer Bay was a famed fishing spot known as Te Kawa Rimurapa (reef of the bull kelp). One day Hinerangi’s husband and two others went fishing there and were overwhelmed by a large wave and tragically drowned.

Distraught, Hinerangi climbed to this headland and scanned the seas of Waikarekare, longing for her husbands return. Inconsolable Hinerangi sat on this headland for days until she too died of a broken heart and set off along Te Rerenga Wairua (journey of the spirits) to join her beloved.

Her disconsolate face was forever etched into the rock face of the headland on which she sat. It became known as Te Ahua o Hinerangi (the likeness of Hinerangi) and can still be seen today from the cliffs high above the southern end of Te Unuhanga o Rangitoto (Mercer Bay).

In my own Time (Lonnie Hutchinson)

Untitled (My Lovely). Lonnie Hutchinson

Untitled (My Lovely). Lonnie Hutchinson

These works are part of an exhibition “In my own Time” by Lonnie Hutchinson at the Mangere Arts Centre. Part of the Matariki Festival 2011, from June 4 to July 4. The material is black builders tar paper (and metal fasteners), precision cut and beautifully illuminated. Definitely worth a visit.

Matariki is the Maori New Year, marking the appearance of the constellation of the Pleiades, and winter. Over recent years, it has become increasingly popular as a focal point for festivals of all kinds, claiming a unique New Zealand occasion. And in winter, you need something that warms heart and soul.

Next door, in Gallery 2 of the Mangere Arts Centre, is another fascinating work: “A Journey in Fibre” by Ngaahina Hohaia. A textile based installation, transported into another dimension by the use of projected light – very creative.

For more black and white images check out Dragonstar’s Weekend in Black and White.

Before Sunrise, Detail. Lonnie Hutchinson

Before Sunrise, Detail. Lonnie Hutchinson

A calm Morning (French Bay)

French Bay

French Bay

It is calm and the haze obliterates all features of the horizon. A peaceful place to welcome the light.

For more weekend reflections, go to James’ Weekend Reflections site.

Winter Evening

View from Scenic Drive

View from Scenic Drive

The view from Scenic Drive just north of the Arataki Visitor Centre. The bush of the Waitakere Ranges in the foreground, the Lower Nihotupu Reservoir, and the Manukau Harbour. In the sky, the lower clouds have already lost the sun, whilst the higher clouds still get a faint pink.

More Skywatch images at the Skywatch Site!

Last Light over the City

Auckland, seen from the West

Auckland, seen from the West

These are the shortest days for us, the sun setting about 5:12 p.m. On my way home along Scenic Drive, I briefly stopped at the Arataki Visitor Centre, to watch the shadows of the Waitakere Ranges encroaching onto the city, as the sun set behind my back. From the upstairs entrance to the centre, the Sky Tower and volcanic Rangitoto Island are nicely aligned.

See also last years post of July 2.

Winter (Waimauku)

Winter

Winter

It is the winter solstice today, at 05:16 this morning, to be precise, the very moment when this post is published. Winter in New Zealand starts on June 1, but in other countries the convention is to align the seasons with solstice and equinox dates. In this spirit we acknowledge winter with this warmly wrapped up statue above the entrance to the Settlers Country Manor and Gamekeepers Restaurant in Waimauku. I can’t think of any other places around here where there are representations of the seasons. Maybe I did not look?

A coat to keep him warm, a fire at his feet, and even a burglar alarm to keep him safe.

Taking Aim

Two Flat Whites @ A Tavola

Two Flat Whites @ A Tavola

jb, global wanderer (click the links to follow in his steps – well some of them, anyway), equally at home in Mainz as in Aotearoa-New Zealand (to name but two places in order to keep this post to an acceptable length), made an appearance in Titirangi recently. We had an extended flat white at “A Tavola”, in the historic Lopdell House, overlooking the trees.

Charming stories, great observation of people and events, always a pleasure to meet up. For another version of the encounter – and the view from the iphone, visit Mainz Daily Photo.

The City Daily Photo community is big enough to keep him traveling for years to come.

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