Auckland - West

Mainly West of Queen Street - seen through my lens

Month: August 2012

Feldberg

Feldberg

Feldberg

With a height of 1493 metres, the Feldberg is the highest elevation in the Black Forest, Germany. Seen here from the top of the observation tower (1302m) on the Schauinsland near Freiburg.

A big cloud had settled above the peak when we were there.

More Skywatch images at the Skywatch Site!

One in a Million

JB Surveying Kreuzstrasse

JB Surveying Kreuzstrasse

Meetings between Mainz and Auckland have become a fine tradition over some 18 months or so (see here and here and here), and the most recent one succeeded against huge odds. This time on German soil, in Bad Kreuznach, and in an extended setting.

I have yet to determine how brother-in-law Martin who had never met jb, figured that the somewhat jet-lagged person sticking out of the crowd could be no other than Mr MainzDailyPhoto, guiding him and Mrs jb to our meeting place. But then, jb is one in a million!

The suggestion to move on to the Brauwerk was superb, and a good time was had until well after dark. May there be many more such occasions!

Herta, Anneliese, Luca, Petra, Martin, John

Herta, Anneliese, Luca, Petra, Martin, John

Ready for Breakfast

Luca Descending

Luca Descending

There was an unusual (for me, anyway) number of spiral stairs on our travels in Germany. Many attached to residential dwellings. This one here leads to the upper level of the Gasthaus Zur Rotenfelsstube in Traisen.

For more black and white images check out Dragonstar’s Weekend in Black and White.

Gulls

A Mob of Red-Billed Gulls

A Mob of Red-Billed Gulls

These red-billed gulls must have found some food scraps, as they fluttered about, making a major racket.

For more black and white images check out Dragonstar’s Weekend in Black and White.

Footprints

Piha Sand

Piha Sand

After a fine weekend day at Piha beach, there are lots of footprints in the sand. The long toe in the picture below caught my attention, as we seemed to follow the tracks of this person. The image above is a completely different shape and walking or running style, and the difference in the direction of the light makes the two images quite different.

For more black and white images check out Dragonstar’s Weekend in Black and White.

Piha Sand

Piha Sand

Stairs — Auckland Baptist Tabernacle

Shadows

Shadows

Last Thursday we went to the “Urban Heaven” exhibition of paintings and photographs, organised by Himali McInnes. Photographer friend Baron Collocott had entered (and sold) an image in the show. Easily distracted, I got interested in the stairs leading down from the gallery, especially the shadows projected onto the wall. After a first shot, some visitors approached, making their way up and apologising profusely for getting into my way. When I showed them the result, they understood why I was very grateful for their appearance…

For more black and white images check out Dragonstar’s Weekend in Black and White.

Littered with Numbers

Numbers and Puddles: Ken Maunder Park Bridge

Numbers and Puddles: Ken Maunder Park Bridge

The City Daily Photo theme for July is “Numbers”. Check Facebook for other participants. Or click here to view thumbnails for all participants.

The Ken Maunder Park Footbridge connects Kelston and New Lynn, crossing a tidal estuary that is a tributary to the Whau river. This is a relatively new replacement of an older bridge, and I had not visited it until a couple of weeks ago. The pavement is littered with numbers — just what I needed for August Theme Day!

I found it intriguing that a wavy pattern emerges on the surface if one is at some distance, but this is not noticeable when one looks up close.

There is an interesting Flickr page about the background of the design, I reproduce the words of the designers (The Letter Q):

The brief for the project stipulated that’s the sports from local playing fields and clubs be expressed in the work.

The starting point was to look at the various scores from the club points tables and the fields of numbers which express and measure sporting performance.

Numerals were then used to generate a sequence of running shapes. The sequence shows several phases of movement on one surface and can be followed from one end of the bridge to the other.

The sequence takes inspiration from early photographic studies capturing the structure of bodily motion.

The material used for the surface is a ‘bendable concrete’ called Flexus™, and they have some more documentation regarding the bridge on their website.

Some history of the Ken Maunder Park by Phil Hanson can be found on the Timespanner’s blog.

Littered with Numbers: Ken Maunder Park Bridge

Littered with Numbers: Ken Maunder Park Bridge

Wavy Patterns: Ken Maunder Park Bridge

Wavy Patterns: Ken Maunder Park Bridge

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