Olafur Eliasson: The cubic structural evolution project

Olafur Eliasson: The cubic structural evolution project

For more black and white images check out Dragonstar’s Weekend in Black and White.

The other day I was passing by the Auckland Art Gallery in Kitchener Street, when the big atrium window upstairs caught my eye, where young and old people were busy assembling structures from Lego pieces.

From the Gallery website:

The cubic structural evolution project, 2004, is a hands-on installation by Danish-Icelandic artist, Olafur Eliasson (b. 1967 Copenhagen). Comprising thousands of pieces of white Lego bricks scattered on a 12-metre-long table, the work invites Gallery visitors to become ‘architects’ by using the Lego to create endlessly re-forming structures limited only by imagination.

Towering cityscapes emerge out of the rubble of Lego bricks and constantly evolve as new visitors contribute to the work through construction, modification, destruction and re-construction – processes inherent to the lifecycle of any metropolis.

Being born in Denmark, Olafur Eliasson shares a connection with popular construction toy Lego (named from the Danish ‘leg godt’ meaning ‘play well’). The cubic structural evolution project, 2004, comments on community decision-making and urbanism and explores the relationship between maker, spectator and object.

This exhibit is here for the long run (1 September 2014 – 1 March 2015), but especially handy during the present school holidays.

The cross-hatched and chevron motifs composed from fluorescent tubes belong to the work of Aboriginal artist Jonathan Jones “untitled (sum of the parts)” (with reflections in various panes of glass).