Auckland - West

Mainly West of Queen Street - seen through my lens

Month: January 2016 (page 1 of 2)

PUUUSH

Number Plate

Number Plate

I don’t think the car was broken down…

Pied Stilt

Pied Stilt

Pied Stilt

Pied stilts (Himantopus himantopus) are black and white wading birds with pinkish legs. In the present perspective the legs are hidden.

For more black and white images check out Dragonstar’s Weekend in Black and White.

Pied Stilt

Pied Stilt

The Volunteer

Jane

Jane

Taumanu Reserve is a recreational area of about 7 hectares of reclaimed land which has been constructed over the last three years or so. To be enjoyed by people, by the birdlife, and if unlucky, by rats and stoats and other unwanted creatures. To prevent the latter, there is a good number of traps spread over the grounds.

The other day when I was visiting the reserve, I found Jane busy at work, inspecting the traps, supplying fresh bait and performing general maintenance. She is a volunteer, Operations Director with the Wildlife Conservation Trust of New Zealand. And she is an ambassador for the place, responding to questions from the public, explaining her work, pointing out the roosting birds: oystercatchers, pied stilts, dotterels. On my visit, the traps were empty, which I assume to be a good sign, meaning that the rodents stay out. And the presence of pied stilt chicks would confirm this.

Thanks Jane, great work!

Interactions

Interactions

Danger!

Danger!

Black and White

Picket Fence and Bench

Picket Fence and Bench

Black bench – a few slats short of a backrest. Mount Eden.

Hear No, See No, and Speak No … (Richard McWhannell 1989)

Hear No, See No, and Speak No take a walk

Hear No, See No, and Speak No take a walk

The TSB Bank Wallace Arts Centre has an exhibition of works by Richard McWhannell: “In My Own Time: 1972 – 2015”. The majority of his works are paintings, but some sculptures are also on show.

The exhibition runs until April 10.

Cuteness Alert

Pied Stilt Chick

Pied Stilt Chick

The newly reclaimed Onehunga foreshore – now named “Taumanu Reserve” – was opened last November. It is pleasing to see that after all the disturbance with heavy earthmoving machinery etc the birds appear to have adopted the place. Oystercatchers and pied stilts are roosting there regularly, and a number of NZ dotterels are in residence; ducks and herons too.

And the pied stilts have offspring.

Pied Stilt Chick

Pied Stilt Chick

Fortune Plums

Fortune Plums

Fortune Plums

Big and juicy and full of flavour. Plums are in season, and Fortune Plums are our favorites.

When is a door …

Ajar

Ajar

… not a door?

Tui

Tui (Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae)

Tui (Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae)

The tui (Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae) is an endemic New Zealand bird of the honeyeater family. The tuft of white feathers at the throat explains the obsolete English name “parson bird”. Shown here on New Zealand flax (phormium tenax) at the Arataki Lookout.

For more black and white images check out Dragonstar’s Weekend in Black and White.

Karaka

Karaka (Corynocarpus laevigatus)

Karaka (Corynocarpus laevigatus)

Karaka (Corynocarpus laevigatus) is an endemic New Zealand tree with glossy evergreen leaves. The pulp of the berries is said to be edible, while the raw stones are toxic (cooking them long enough apparently can make them edible — I think I will give them a miss).

Taumanu Reserve, Onehunga

Karaka (Corynocarpus laevigatus)

Karaka (Corynocarpus laevigatus)

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