Auckland - West

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Kuri Topiary (Steve Woodward, 2007)

Kuri Topiary (Steve Woodward, 2007)

Kuri Topiary (Steve Woodward, 2007)

Steve Woodward‘s dog “Kuri Topiary” seems to have escaped into the open spaces at Hobsonville Point. Last time I saw the 3 meter high sculpture, it was garaged in Steve’s large sculpting shed.

On the way to Hobsonville Market and Hobsonville Point Wharf.

Enquiries to: Hobsonville Land Company – ph 09 2615054 or info@hlc.co.nz

Kuri is the maori word for dog, and the topiary part obviously refers to the leafy structures that were formed into the shape of a dog.

Kuri Topiary (Detail)

Kuri Topiary (Detail)

Spinning Tiers (Steve Woodward 2006/07)

Spinning Tiers (Steve Woodward (2006/07)

Spinning Tiers (Steve Woodward (2006/07)

Presently on display at the Karanga Plaza, Wynyard Quarter, as part of the Summer of Sculpture. Bronze, stainless steel bearing system, granite base. Contact: (09) 827 1438 or mobile +64 21 256 5117.

And, yes, it does spin — give it a whirl!

Catalogue note: “Spinning Tiers is both a monument, a memorial to our threatened world and a celebration of life through the dynamic elements that make up our universe. Ref to the Sotoba or Go Rin To it is a tower of five elements.”

We have shown other work by Steve Woodward on this blog before.

Spinning Tiers (Steve Woodward (2006/07)

Spinning Tiers (Steve Woodward (2006/07)

Steve Woodward, Sculptor

Steve Woodward

Steve Woodward

Last weekend over 200 artists in the West opened their doors to connect with the public during the West Artists’ Open Studio Weekend. I grabbed the opportunity to visit Steve Woodward whose work featured on this blog on a number of occasions (Stand Turn Spin, Waituarangi Bridge, Step Touch Stone, Whau Pod). Once I had found his studio (in amongst a cluster of warehouses), it was interesting to hear about his work and how he developed his craft working for Italian and French sculptors.

Steve is an internationally recognized artist, with work in public and private collections here and in Australia, Canada, China, France, Italy, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand.

A picture by Nguyễn văn Tuấn of Kuri Topiary roaming the Botanic Gardens is here.

Steve Woodward, 10 Portage Road, New Lynn, ph +64 9 849 6501.

Guarding the Studio: Kuri Topiary (2007)

Guarding the Studio: Kuri Topiary (2007)

Sculptures and Sculptor

Sculptures and Sculptor

Two Parachutists

Two Parachutists

Whau Pod (Steve Woodward 2007)

Whau Pod (Steve Woodward 2007)

Whau Pod (Steve Woodward 2007)

Olympic Park in New Lynn (map) is home to a good number of works by Steve Woodward. This one is entitled Whau Pod, and if one thinks of these pods in terms of yesterday’s post (I certainly would), then one might well mutter about artistic licence and such like. However, the answer lies in looking at the pods after they have fully ripened, as in the picture below: one can clearly see the six chambers, filled with seeds of some pinkish coloration – the sculpture depicts their falling out of the pod.

One of the streams bordering Olympic Park is the Whau Stream.

Whau Pod with Seeds

Whau Pod with Seeds

Step Touch Stone (Steve Woodward, 2009)

Step Touch Stone (Steve Woodward, 2009)

Step Touch Stone (Steve Woodward, 2009)

This sculpture, made from Shanxi black granite, stands in St Patrick’s Square in the City. The artwork was commissioned by the city in the course of the refurbishment of this public space (officially opened October 2009). We have shown other works of Steve Woodward, and more will follow.

See a picture of Steve Woodward at work on this project.

Lachezar has a splendid picture of St Patrick’s Cathedral and the top of the square.

Another view of the sculpture:

Step Touch Stone (Steve Woodward, 2009)

Step Touch Stone (Steve Woodward, 2009)

Cones Rule OK!

King of the Cones

King of the Cones

There are way too many traffic cones. So many, in fact, that they have to be stored on the streets, cluttering up roadways, because there is no storage space elsewhere. And some of them end up in more unlikely places, like this one on top of Steve Woodward‘s Olympic Park Bridge

By the way, the cone I showed high up on top of a Norfolk pine on January 3, 2010, is still firmly in its place!

Olympic Park: Bridge

Olympic Park: Bridge

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Book Launch: Mary McIntyre at Whitespace

Book Launch: Mary McIntyre at Whitespace

Book Launch: Mary McIntyre at Whitespace

On Tuesday evening, Whitespace Contemporary Art hosted the launch of Robin Woodward‘s book “Mary McIntyre – Painter”. The evening marked also the opening of an exhibition of work by Mary McIntyre, as well as an exhibition of pieces by metal artist Greer Twiss. This is a subjective and incomplete selection of impressions of the evening.

In the top row we see Gallery director Deborah White in front of Mary’s painting “Deborah Whitespace”, then gallery co-director Kenneth Johnson and the book, and art critic TJ McNamara in front of his portrait. The second row shows (left to right) painter Jan Nigro with Rita Webster, and Herta with Mary McIntyre at the signing of the book.

The book by Robin Woodward is published by Whitespace, Auckland, May 2010. Mary McIntyre is represented by Deborah White of Whitespace. Robin Woodward is also the author of the book “Steve Woodward” (the sculptor who featured a number of times on this blog – no relation of hers), also published by Whitespace.

Greer Twiss was kind enough to pose with one of his larger works – the dog that goes with it is obscured.

Greer Twiss

Greer Twiss

Live musical entertainment was provided by Jonathan Besser (keyboard), with John Bell (vibraphone) and Peter Scott (bass).

The Musicians

The Musicians

Olympic Park: Bridge

Olympic Park: Bridge

Olympic Park: Bridge

This elegant bridge over the Avondale Stream (Wai Tahurangi) in Olympic Park was engineered by URS Corporation on the basis of the artistic vision of local sculptor Steve Woodward. Putting it in place under the high tension wires was a challenge, described in a press release by URS.

Stand Turn Spin

Stand Turn Spin (Steve Woodward, 2004)

Stand Turn Spin (Steve Woodward, 2004)

This sculpture (2004) by the New Zealand/Canadian Steve Woodward is located in front of the Trusts Stadium (map), at the top of the steps leading down to the Douglas Track and Field. At a height of 4.2 metres, it is a massive piece of basalt representing the traditional spinning top, with the bronze spindle above reminding us of the pump-action children’s toy. I was very surprised when I learned that this sculpture actually moves:
“The sculpture is mounted on a hidden bearings system, enabling people to, with moderate effort, turn the ‘top’.” (From notes at http://stephen.woodward.free.fr/spin.swf.) Of course, I had to try it, and indeed it turns, the effort being commensurate with the significant mass of the piece.

A booklet by Robin Woodward about the artist is available from Whitespace Galleries, Ponsonby, where he had an exhibition of sculptures in September-October 2009. Several other sculptures by this artist are in public spaces in Auckland.

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