Auckland - West

Mainly West of Queen Street - seen through my lens

Search results: "kanuka" (page 1 of 2)

Kanuka Blossom

Kanuka Blossom

Kanuka Blossom

The white patches in the bush are getting paler, as the flowering season of the ti trees comes to an end. Kanuka and Manuka are both generically known as “ti tree” (or tea tree – the fine leaves can be used to brew an infusion), and both used to be classified as leptospermum. But nowadays, kanuka is known as Kunzea ericoides. It has small leaves and small flowers, but grows to the impressive height of up to 15 metres (in windy coastal positions it may remain a bushy shrub). Kanuka plays an important role in the regeneration of the bush, in that its high canopy provides shelter to other seedlings growing below.

(By contrast, manuka is a smaller shrub, with larger leaves and larger flowers. Tomorrow there will be a picture.)

Read more about manuka honey and manuka oil.

Kanuka Listening

Wood Ear Fungus

Wood Ear Fungus

A wood ear fungus has sprouted on this old kanuka tree – listening in to our every word…

The Bush in Bloom

The Bush in Bloom

The Bush in Bloom

This time of year, manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) and kanuka (Kunzea ericoides) trees are in flower, adding patches of white to the basic green of the bush. We will look at the flowers up close in later posts. Taken at Anawhata.

Manuka Blossom

Manuka Blossom

Manuka Blossom

The picture shows some similarity with the kanuka flowers, but the flowers of manuka (leptospermum scoparium) are larger (about 15mm diameter), the leaves of manuka are prickly and larger than those of kanuka. The plant is usually a shrub of up to 5 metres. Some manuka shrubs have pinkish-red flowers, and there are deep red cultivars of the species.

Read more about manuka honey and manuka oil.

This post relates to earlier posts about white patches in the bush and kanuka blossom.

The Wood Pigeon

Wood Pigeon

Wood Pigeon

Recently we had more wood pigeons (hemiphaga novaeseelandiae) around the house than ever before. I was just going to have breakfast on the deck when this one flew into a nearby kanuka tree, staying long enough to let me get my camera, and obligingly moving its head forward into the sunlight.

They are Back

Vespula Germanica

Vespula Germanica

Every summer, the wasps visit us in greater or lesser numbers, and presently the first ones have arrived. They are attracted to the timber rail of our deck where they take shavings for use in the construction of their nests. The kanuka trees nearby are hosts to scale insects producing sweet sap, another attraction for the insects.

When they fly inside the house, they will inevitably try to escape, dancing up and down the window panes – fodder for the camera, if I am fast enough to follow them. This shot was taken with flash, producing a nice double reflection.

For more black and white images check out Dragonstar’s Weekend in Black and White.

Daydreaming (Kereru)

New Zealand Wood Pigeon

New Zealand Wood Pigeon

This New Zealand Wood Pigeon (Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae, kereru) had found a comfortable resting place in the forked branches of a kanuka tree next to our deck, where it stayed for quite some time.

Thanks to Mrs H for alerting me to it.

Painted Boxes: Waikumete Impressions (Monique Endt)

Transformer in West Coast Road by Monique Endt

Transformer in West Coast Road by Monique Endt

This transformer is in West Coast Road, Glen Eden, below the Waikumete Cemetery and near the Waikumete stream. It captures the essential elements of the location: manuka/kanuka shrubbery, the railway line, and most conspicuously the feathery heads of the toi toi on the hillside. The painter is Monique Endt.

Painted Boxes: Bush and Birds (Monique Endt)

Bush and Birds: Monique Endt

Bush and Birds: Monique Endt

This transformer stands outside 13 Forest Hill Road, Henderson. It appears to be a replacement of an earlier transformer, also painted by Monique Endt, the new box sitting on a stately concrete pad, elevated from the ground. Again, New Zealand Wood Pigeons feature prominently, with one of their favorite food sources, the Nikau palm. Ferns and manuka/kanuka trees and kawakawa (whose round leaves always seem to have holes eaten into them) illustrate the bush. A typical pose for the pukeko (swamp hen) shows the almost human hand-like claws. And round the corner a trio of fantails flits about in search of insects.

Painting by Monique Endt. Monique is a local artist and has featured here before.

The Pukeko

The Pukeko

Fantails

Fantails

Kereru

Kereru (New Zealand Wood Pigeon)

Kereru (New Zealand Wood Pigeon)

When they pose in such excellent light, I find the wood pigeons (Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae) irresistible. Does not happen too often, but every now and then I like to show them off. Sitting on a kanuka tree. Thanks again to Mrs H who alerted me to its presence.

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