Auckland - West

Mainly West of Queen Street - seen through my lens

Search results: "komoki"

Self Portrait with Te Komoki

Manukau Heads and Te Komoki

Manukau Heads and Te Komoki

The view from the Huia Point platform, with Manukau Heads and lighthouse on the left, Manukau bar, and the conical Te Komoki on the right.

See my growing collection of selfies.

More Skywatch images at the Skywatch Site!

Te Komoki and Rainbow

Te Komoki and Rainbow

Te Komoki and Rainbow

The conical hill at right is Te Komoki (Jackie Peak, map), which featured in this blog before. We are standing on Huia Point Lookout, the sun has just risen, and there is a light mist in the air, slowly drifting over towards us.

Advertisement: an exhibition of paintings by Don Binney, Seaward Paths to Erangi, will be held at The Diversion Gallery, Grove Mill Winery, Cnr State Highway 63 and Waihopai Valley Road, Renwick, Marlborough. Opening at 6 p.m. on Monday, 21 June to 7 August. Don Binney, who turned 70 earlier in the year, has a deep connection to the Waitakere Ranges, going right back to his youth.

The major painting in the exhibition depicts Te Komoki with a large spur-winged plover (a ‘masked lapwing’ for Australians), entitled Huia Bay Spurwing II. (If you are curious, here is a page which shows Huia Bay Spurwing I   among other pictures by Don Binney.)

Te Komoki (Jackie Peak)

Te Komoki (Jackie Peak)

Te Komoki (Jackie Peak)

The cone of Te Komoki (map) rises to 148 metres above the settlement of Little Huia  and is also known as Jackie Peak. It forms the western headland of Huia Bay, opposite of Huia Point.

Te Komoki features in an artwork by Don Binney: Toreapango, Te Komoki (2008) depicting an oystercatcher flying across Huia Bay.

There is Australia!

Foster Bay and Entrance to Manukau Harbour

Foster Bay and Entrance to Manukau Harbour

No, I did not say you could see Australia. But if you go past Manukau Heads through the narrow gap, and keep going West, you will eventually reach Australia (or some unspeakable adventure).

Meanwhile, in the foreground we have Foster Bay, Huia, and the cone of Te Komoki (Jackie Peak), seen from Huia Road.

Painted Boxes: The Portage (Sean McCarthy, 2011)

The Portage - Looking towards the Waitemata Harbour

The Portage - Looking towards the Waitemata Harbour

Auckland lies on an isthmus formed by Manukau Harbour and Waitemata Harbour, the latter opening out to the Pacific Ocean, and the former to the Tasman Sea. One of the narrowest land passages between the two is roughly along what now is “Portage Road”, named after the fact that Maori used this stretch of land and the waters of Avondale Stream (Wai Tahurangi) to move their canoes from one side to the other.

This transformer is near the intersection of Portage and Golf Roads, next to the Avondale Stream. The artist depicts a glimpse of Rangitoto Island as you look north to the Waitemata Harbour, and Manukau Heads with the cone of Te Komoki as one looks south. And in between footprints in the wetlands. Painted by Sean McCarthy, 2011.

The Portage - Looking towards the Manukau Harbour

The Portage - Looking towards the Manukau Harbour

Little Huia

Little Huia

Little Huia

This ageing boat house watches over the outgoing tide on a grey and misty morning. It is located at the end of Huia Road, where Whatipu Road leaves the coast to cross the ranges. The hill rising behind the building is Te Komoki (Jackie Peak).

Lopdell House Book Launch: Don Binney

Don Binney: Floor Talk

Don Binney: Floor Talk

Last Thursday night, Lopdell House Gallery in Titirangi hosted the launch of Don Binney‘s book Drawing the Waitakere Coast, published by Random House.

This handsome volume is the artist’s celebration of his love for the sea, sky and land that make the Waitakere Ranges, a region he is intimately familiar with, and which has featured in his paintings throughout his career.

The book is a beautifully rambling yarn: walking tracks and places, scenery and birdlife, vegetation and surf, rocks and streams, people and events past and present, melded into one fulsome whole by the author’s musings and deep knowledge of the place. A bonus (in fact, you might consider it reason enough to purchase the volume) are 24 drawings by this renowned New Zealand artist, rendered in delicate coloured pencil, all of them untitled – you recognise the landmarks. The original drawings by Don Binney were on display in the gallery, a delight to behold (on view until June 7).

Friday morning, the celebration continued with a “Floor Talk” by the author and artist, well attended, beyond the gallery’s expectation. Don Binney is a storyteller extraordinaire, speaking from the heart and generously sharing his life.

It would be unfair not to mention the main exhibition which also opened at Lopdell House on Thursday night (and, indeed, Don acknowledged these artworks himself in an enthusiastic way): a selection of 40 of the finalists in the Adam Portraiture awards 2010.

An exhibition of paintings by Don Binney will be held in June, at The Diversion Gallery, Grove Mill Winery, Waihopai Valley Road, Marlborough. More information on the artist is available from their website.

Attentive followers of my blog may recognise the drawing seen in the photo above as Te Komoki (Jackie Peak), shown in my post of December 28, 2009 — the beginning of the journey of Don’s book, from Huia in the South to Te Henga in the North..

Don Binney: Book Signing

Don Binney: Book Signing

Location Signs: Huia

Huia Sign

Huia Sign


Many of the communities out west have artistic welcome signs. Here is the one of Huia (map), depicting the extinct Huia bird, pohutukawa blossom, Huia Bay flanked on the right by the cone of Te Komoki, with Huia Point on the left; South Manukau Head opens to the Tasman Sea in the distance.

Artwork by Chris Hunt.

Added October 2012: the above image was (mis-)”appropriated” in slides for a paper by Paul McPadden and Maria Clarke on “Current tax and legal issues in sport”, published on the website of the NZ Institute of Chartered Accountants (nobody ever asked for permission).

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