Mainly West of Queen Street - seen through my lens

Category: pou (Page 1 of 2)

Standing Guard

Pou

Pou

The Oakley Creek shared path runs between Unitec and New North Road, Mount Albert. About halfway along is this pou (guardian pole).

Te Ao Whanui (Whare Thompson 2012)

Te Ao Whanui (Whare Thompson 2012)

Te Ao Whanui (Whare Thompson 2012)

Each of the approaches to the Huruhuru Creek bridge on Triangle Road (Henderson/Massey) are decorated with a row of pou (poles), and a pair of guardians in the shape of a boat closest to the bridge.…

Two Pou by the Opanuku Stream

Rongo-Ma-Tane (Whare Thompson)

Rongo-Ma-Tane (Whare Thompson)

Carved by master carver Whare Thompson in collaboration with Maori studies students from Henderson High School. Rongo-Ma-Tane, the Maori God of cultivated food, carved from Hinuera stone, and Haumie Tike Tike, the Maori God of uncultivated food, carved from totara.…

Pou Whenua: Karanga-a-Hape — Cornwallis

Hape

Hape

Near the Pine Avenue entrance to Cornwallis Beach stands this pou, depicting Hape (an ancestor of the local Kawerau-a-Maki tribe) and local taniwha (guardians of the Manukau Harbour).

“Te Karanga-a-Hape is the Maori name for Cornwallis. It recalls the moment when ‘upon the call of Hape’ a trap near here was sprung, ensnaring a visiting taniwha.”

Pou Whenua: Tiriwa at Arataki

Tiriwa

Tiriwa

Tiriwa is an ancester of the local Maori tribe, the Kawerau a Maki. Their name for the Waitakere Ranges is “Te Wao Nui a Tiriwa” (The Great Forest of Tiriwa). The main carver of this pou, situated out the back of the Arataki Visitor Centre, is Sunnah Thompson, showing a minimalist styling in this pou.…

Two Pou: Skate Plaza

Waiatarau (Lenard Phillips)

Waiatarau (Lenard Phillips)

A $1 million skate board and BMX course opened at Beaumont Street in October 2011. It incorporates two pou (Maori carvings in the form of poles), one named Waiatarau, carved by Lenard Phillips, and the other Te Mau Mahara, carved by Lee Ralph – the latter aptly clutching a skateboard, updating traditional shapes.…

Tūmatauenga

Tūmatauenga

Tūmatauenga

This pou guards Entry D of Eden Park.

From the interpretive plaque:

Tūmatauenga, Māori God of war, stands above wielding a taiaha – a traditional combat staff employed in times of conflict. As a dedication to this deity of contest, any arena where battle ensues is bestowed the name Te Marae Ātea a Tūmatauenga – the battle domain of Tūmatauenga.

Tāwhirimātea

Tāwhirimātea

Tāwhirimātea

This pou stands at Entry A of Eden Park.

From the interpretive plaque:

Tāwhirimātea, Maori God of wind and weather signifies the natural elements and their collective influence on the nature of sporting contests. Tāwhirimātea holds the Tewhatewha, a weapon used by the commanding leader to direct warriors into battle formations.

Tānemāhuta

Tānemāhuta

Tānemāhuta

This pou depicting Tānemāhuta is at Eden Park, Entry H. It is the only pou I am aware of that is coloured black. From the interpretive plaque:

Tānemāhuta, Maori god of the forests, bears the pou whenua – a tool traditionally used to mark tribal boundaries and engaged with equal distinction as a weapon should those boundaries be contested.

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