Auckland – West                          Mainly West of Queen Street – seen through my lens

May 21, 2017

220,000 VOLTS

Filed under: Mangere,Manukau,Onehunga,Volcanoes — paul @ 8:00 pm
Pylon

Pylon

Do not climb (the pylon, that is; it is pylon 32 on Line A between Otahuhu to Henderson). More importantly: clear blue sky with a promise of (so far) the coldest night to come (3 degrees C expected). In the background right: Mangere Mountain, one of our volcanic hills. Manukau Cruising Club in the foreground.

February 16, 2016

One Tree Hill

Filed under: Hillsborough,Volcanoes — paul @ 8:15 am
One Tree Hill

One Tree Hill

One Tree Hill is one of the cones on the Auckland Volcanic Field. Seen here from the Pah Homestead.

June 7, 2015

Big King

Filed under: Mount Eden,Volcanoes — paul @ 7:01 am
Big King

Big King

The Three Kings (Te Tātua-a-Riukiuta) is a complex volcano (28,500 years old) within the Auckland volcanic field, which at some time had three prominent cones. Nowadays, only one of them remains, the Big King, the others having been quarried away. Seen from Bank Street, Mount Eden.

November 1, 2014

One Tree Hill

Filed under: Volcanoes — paul @ 7:20 am
One Tree Hill

One Tree Hill

The City Daily Photo theme for November is “Landmarks”. Click here for landmarks throughout the world.

The Auckland Volcanic Field comprises over 50 volcanoes, with the earliest eruption (Onepoto) about 250,000 years ago, and the most recent one (Rangitoto) about 600 years ago. Most appear as hills, but some of them are under water as lagoon or lake – and some buried beneath volcanic ash. The eruption of One Tree Hill, shown here, is not dated precisely, but thought to go back at least 28,000 years. With its obelisk, One Tree Hill is a well loved landmark, visible from many places, also a great lookout when you are on top. You can read about the “one” tree (which is not there any more) in wikipedia, and a picture is here.

Looking down into one of its craters

Looking down into one of its craters

June 1, 2014

Volcanoes

Filed under: Mount Eden,Volcanoes — paul @ 7:08 am
View of Auckland from Mount Eden

View of Auckland from Mount Eden

A beautiful day yesterday, as we looked out across the crater of Mount Eden to Mount Victoria and North Head on the other side of the Harbour, with Rangitoto Island in the back.

June 19, 2013

Tholoid

Filed under: Mangere,Volcanoes — paul @ 7:15 am
Mangere Mountain

Mangere Mountain

We are on the rim of the main crater of Mangere Mountain (eruption about 20,000 years ago), and bang in the middle of the crater is a hump about 12 metres high — a plug of solidified magma (basalt) that was pushed out of the throat of the volcano after the main eruption by mounting pressure from below. Geologists call that a tholoid. The picture of the lagoon was taken from the opposite position on the rim.

June 9, 2013

Mangere Lagoon

Filed under: Mangere,Volcanoes — paul @ 7:12 am
Mangere Lagoon from Mangere Mountain

Mangere Lagoon from Mangere Mountain

Mangere Mountain, from which this photo was taken, is a volcano that erupted about 20,000 years ago. Mangere Lagoon with its central scoria cone is the explosion crater of an earlier eruption (date not available). About 7000 years ago, rising sea levels broke the tuff ring and created the lagoon. During the last 40 or so years of last century, the lagoon served as sludge ponds for the sewage treatment plant. This has ended, and the lagoon restored. A pleasant walkway leads right around it (connected to the Watercare coastal walkway); a good place to watch wading birds.

In the distance to the right of the picture one recognises Manukau Heads (the opening of the Manukau Harbour to the Tasman Sea), with Puketutu Island in front.

About a year ago, I showed a picture of Mangere Mountain, shot across the lagoon.

July 9, 2012

The Crater

Filed under: Mount Eden,Volcanoes — paul @ 7:06 am
Mount Eden

Mount Eden

With 196 metres above sea level, Mount Eden is the highest elevation on the Auckland isthmus, one of over 50 volcanoes that characterise our landscape. Its crater is 50 metres deep (I assume that is measured from the summit), and here we look up from the lowest point of the rim.

Mount Eden erupted about 28,000 years ago.

November 18, 2011

Smile!

Filed under: Volcanoes — paul @ 7:31 am
On Top of Mount Eden

On Top of Mount Eden

With an elevation of 196 metres, Mount Eden is the highest point of Auckland’s urban landscape (about the same height as the pergola of the Sky Tower – whose top reaches to 328 metres). It is a wonderful spot from which to get an overview of the sprawling expanse of Auckland, and tourist come by the busload.

The Maori name of the mountain is Maungawhau – Mountain of the Whau Tree. It is a volcanic cone, with a deep crater.

More Skywatch images at the Skywatch Site!